Dogs Rescued from South Korean Meat Farm to Find Safe Haven at Humane Society of Tampa Bay

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UPDATE (March 6, 2017): All but three of the Korean pups have been adopted and their smitten parents are sending us great photos and even better reports of their progress.  Bambi, Billy, Banjo, Annie, Reggie, Harriet, and Adele are doing well and making steps towards being happy, healthy, NORMAL pups.

     

     


UPDATE (February 15, 2017): BIG NEWS! Korean Dog Meat Farm survivors Billy, Banjo, Bambi, Alphie, Jenna and Zoe will be available for adoption THIS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17! If you are interested in adopting you MUST come to the shelter and adoptions are considered on a first-come, first-served basis (no holds, no online or phone adoptions). Please note that the Korean dogs have specific needs and require a level of care that may be too much for some families. Our job is to find the right fit for not only the dogs, but also the humans, and adoptions are approved or denied at the discretion of our trained staff. If you are unable to adopt one of these dogs we hope you will consider one of our good ol’ American dogs, cats, or pocket pets who are equally important, special, and longing to go home. All adoptable pets are viewable HERE.


UPDATE (February 13, 2017): THE FIRST KOREAN DOG ADOPTIONS! We are so excited to announce that Lucy and Reggie went home yesterday. The adopters, a staff member and a volunteer, had formed bonds with the pups and are committed to the training and care they will need to thrive. Lucy and Reggie adjusted to life outside of the meat farm most quickly of the 14 rescues and we are confident that their lives will be fantastic! Their friends who are still with us will become available on different dates as they individually reach the ability to transition into a home. Keep your eye on our website (updated every night by 9) to see when they become available.

MEDIA: VIDEOS OF REGGIE

        

        


UPDATE (February 2, 2017): We love the story these photos tell. From “what is happening to me now?” to “who are you and what are you going to do to me?” to, finally, “Oh, hi! I know you! You are kind. You are my friend. Can we go play now?” Harry is one of the 14 dogs that came to our shelter after being rescued from a dog meat farm in Wonju, Korea. In 1 1/2 weeks he’s gone from staying in the back of his kennel to jumping up to greet us when we approach. from left: his first steps on “Florida soil” after his 8,000 mile journey; afraid to engage with staff and volunteers; relaxed, trusting, and ready to play


UPDATE (January 31, 2017): We are so excited to announce that Rosa had her babies! The five males and one female all appear to be healthy. Rosa is being a good momma but is still extremely stressed. In order to keep her calm, quiet, and feeling safe enough to mother, we are asking that she not have any visitors (including media) at this time. In about a week, we will place her in a foster home with her litter. Because she will not allow humans to approach her she will be placed with a foster parent experienced with the kind of rehabilitation and environment she requires. It will be at least 8 weeks before the puppies are ready for adoption and we are not taking any applications on them at this time. We will keep you updated about all of their progress. Welcome to the world, little ones. We’re so glad to have you safely here.

  


UPDATE (January 30, 2017): As if existence on a meat farm, an international journey, and a whole new environment weren’t stressful enough, we’ve discovered that our Rosa is pregnant. Completely shut down and beyond frightened, Rosa will not let anyone but our trainer near her. Her body language in the photos shows that she is trying to disappear into the wall. After noticing her belly he was finally able to touch her and confirm the pregnancy*. She is very far along and could give birth soon. We have moved her to a quiet kennel away from the hustle and bustle where she can nest and feel more safe. We are extremely grateful that she is not still stuck in a filthy, crowded cage where she’d give birth alone and that her puppies will now have a fighting chance. Looks like we’ll now have 14+ Korean pups in our care! We’ll keep you posted, please send good thoughts her way.

*Rosa also has a cherry eye condition which we will correct when she is spayed.

   


UPDATE (January 25, 2017): Even though our Korean pups are doing well and beginning to adjust, they are still suffering from the horror they endured. The video below shows Harriet falling asleep standing up because she doesn’t understand that she can use the bed provided for her. She is spending the day in our Volunteer Manager’s office to help socialize her and, don’t worry, she was shown gently how to lay down and rest. These dogs have been on an arduous journey and still have a long way to go, but we are hopeful that wagging tails and snuggley beds will become their norm.


UPDATE (January 23, 2017): The last four dogs arrived safely at our shelter last night despite torrential downpours and strong winds. This group appeared more timid and frightened than the first but we have high hopes that with time they will relax. Photos and video can be found on our Facebook page.


UPDATE (January 20, 2017): The first 10 dogs arrived safely at our shelter at 8:15 this evening. Though exhausted, frightened, dirty, and malnourished, they seemed curious and open to the humans around them. We will keep you updated on their recovery and progress. Photos and video can be found on our Facebook page.


UPDATE (January 19, 2017): The staff is busy preparing for the dogs’ arrival and has hung a banner to welcome them “home”.


MEDIA CONTACT: 813.774.4313
BROLL of rescue

Fourteen dogs once bound for slaughter will be brought to the Humane Society of Tampa Bay (HSTB) for a second chance at life. *Rescuers with Humane Society International (HSI) transported 200 dogs saved from a South Korean dog meat farm in Wonju, South Korea, to the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. As an **Emergency Placement Partner with the Humane Society of the United States (HSI is the international affiliate of The HSUS), Humane Society of Tampa Bay is one of 18 shelters across the United States, and one of six in Florida, that will welcome the dogs into their care to be placed for adoption into loving homes. See below for a full list of states and shelters.

Ten of the lucky dogs who will call Tampa their new home will arrive at Orlando International Airport on January 20, 2017 at 5:17pm. Humane Society of Tampa Bay representatives will be at the airport to welcome the dogs and transport them back to the shelter for an estimated arrival of 8:30pm. Media is invited to both locations. The remaining four dogs will arrive in Orlando on January 22, 2017, also at 5:17pm, and be transported to Tampa by Humane Society of Tampa Bay representatives.

“We were absolutely thrilled to be asked to assist with this rescue effort,” said Humane Society of Tampa Bay Chief Executive Officer Sherry Silk. “We are here to help animals in need, no matter where they come from, and will open our doors to them whenever we are able.”

“It has been heartwarming to see the staff’s excitement as they prepare for the arrival of these dogs,” said Humane Society of Tampa Bay Director of Shelter Operations Pam Backer. “We’ve all seen the videos and read the accounts of how much these dogs suffer and we just can’t wait to put our arms around them and tell them that they safe.”

The Humane Society of Tampa Bay will incur all costs of transporting and caring for these dogs until they are adopted. The dogs will likely need several weeks to recover from their journey before being ready to undergo spay/neuter surgery and be placed up for adoption. The Humane Society of Tampa Bay will keep the public updated on their progress through their blog, HumaneSocietyTampa.org/blog, and social media.

HSUS Emergency Placement Partners receiving dogs from the Wonju dog meat farm:

Florida:
Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, hsvb.org
All For One Pet Rescue, allforonerescue.org
Humane Society of Marion County, thehsmc.org
Humane Society of Tampa Bay, humanesocietytampa.org
Humane Society of Broward County, humanebroward.com
Alachua County Humane Society, alachuahumane.org

Virginia:
Lucky Dog Animal Rescue, luckydoganimalrescue.org
Virginia Beach SPCA, vbspca.org
Animal Welfare League of Arlington, awla.org
Homeward Trails Animal Rescue, homewardtrails.org
Angels of Assisi, angelsofassisi.org

Ohio:
Wolfspirits Rescue, wolfspiritsrescue.com
Toledo Area Humane Society, toledohumane.org

Pennsylvania:
Ruth Steinert Memorial SPCA, rsmspca.org
Animal Care Sanctuary, animalcaresanctuary.org

North Carolina:
Pawfect Match Rescue, pawfectmatch.org

Oklahoma:
Humane Society of Tulsa, tulsapets.com

Washington, D.C.:
Humane Rescue Alliance, humanerescuealliance.org

*This rescue marks the sixth dog meat farm closure managed by HSI, with a total of 770 dogs rescued since January 2015 as part of the organization’s campaign to end the dog meat trade in South Korea and across Asia. For more information about HSI’s work to end the dog meat trade in Asia, visit hsi.org/dogmeat.

**Emergency Placement Partners are part of HSUS’s national network that aims to save animals from abuse by assisting with large-scale abuse cases such as hoarding situations, animal fighting, or puppy mill operations.  Once HSUS removes animals from abusive situations, Emergency Placement Partners step up to care for and place the animals. As local groups with access to local resources, Emergency Placement Partners provide the animals with veterinary care, rehabilitation, and ultimately, placement in lifelong homes. For more information on HSUS’s Emergency Placement Partners, visit humanesociety.org/epp.

Photos courtesy of Humane Society International and the Humane Society of the United States.

Photos courtesy of Tampa Bay Times

Photos courtesy of AGoldPhoto

Photos courtesy of Photography by Norman Mark

Photos courtesy of James McCook

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